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                           45 Dalrymple Drive

                           Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803

 

 

 

1920s 

1919-1920

For the first time enrollment hits a maximum capacity of 100.

 

All ten graduates of the previous year attend college.

 

Social activities for students now include dances, picnics and a “moving picture” party.

 

The “Alarm Clock” school newspaper is introduced.

 

Official class rings are introduced for seniors.

 

For the first time, names of student applicants are placed on a waiting list.

 

Principal G.A. Young dies suddenly on February 4, 1922.

 

Mr. John Shoptaugh is named Acting Principal for the remainder of the year.

 

 

1923

Mr. John Shoptaugh is appointed principal and serves in that capacity for the next 18 years.

 

Faculty members are required to attend summer school to study the methods of recognized specialists in education.

 

Seniors in Home Economics are required to plan and teach, under supervision, a minimum of 36 lessons in Demonstration High School home economics classes.

 

7th grade is added, creating a five-year school, beginning with the 1923-1924 session.

 

No lunch room. Students dine in Foster Hall

 

No playgrounds. Students frequent Indian Mounds.

 

No buses. Most students and teachers take the train to school.

 

The name University High School begins to be utilized.

 

A graduation tradition begins with girls wearing long dresses and carrying bouquets of sweet peas and boys wearing white linen suits and sweet pea boutonnieres.

 

 

1925

The school moves from Pentagon campus to Peabody Hall.

 

Demonstration High School becomes officially known as the Laboratory School, but University Demonstration School, Laboratory School, and University High School all are being used interchangeably.

 

 

1926

Teaching fellowships provide part-time teachers, helping to meet the faculty needs brought on by a large growth in enrollment

 

 

1927

Nine students graduate.